What is sustainability?

Developments in human society have greatly improved our quality of life. Yet these developments also risk the continuity of the ecological system and deepens social gaps that harm people’s capacity to meet their needs. ‘Sustainability’ or ‘Sustainable Development’ seeks to find new ways for us to continue our advancement as a society, while ensuring that every person has the chance to live respectfully, regardless of their place of birth, today and in the future. The social and environmental challenges which hinder this aspiration are commonly referred to as ‘The Sustainability Challenge’.




What is the challenge?

The human population is increasing in numbers at a pace of about one billion people per decade. Our consumption rates are increasing rapidly. Today, most of the ecological services (clean air and water, growing food and more) are exploited in a manner that cannot be continued for much longer. At the same time that humanity is profoundly influencing the ecological system, human society continues to face severe issues of inequality, abuse of human rights, corruption, employee exploitation, and discrimination. These problems threaten our social system on a global level. The challenge is complex and extensive, yet it also holds countless opportunities to reshape our reality

What is sustainability?

Developments in human society have greatly improved our quality of life. Yet these developments also risk the continuity of the ecological system and deepens social gaps that harm people’s capacity to meet their needs. ‘Sustainability’ or ‘Sustainable Development’ seeks to find new ways for us to continue our advancement as a society, while ensuring that every person has the chance to live respectfully, regardless of their place of birth, today and in the future. The social and environmental challenges which hinder this aspiration are commonly referred to as ‘The Sustainability Challenge’.


What is the challenge?

The human population is increasing in numbers at a pace of about one billion people per decade. Our consumption rates are increasing rapidly. Today, most of the ecological services (clean air and water, growing food and more) are exploited in a manner that cannot be continued for much longer. At the same time that humanity is profoundly influencing the ecological system, human society continues to face severe issues of inequality, abuse of human rights, corruption, employee exploitation, and discrimination. These problems threaten our social system on a global level. The challenge is complex and extensive, yet it also holds countless opportunities to reshape our reality

The sustainability principles

The sustainability principles constitute a comprehensive guideline for the  pursuit of sustainable development. The principles were developed under a broad scientific consensus process, based on physics laws and in-depth ongoing academic research.

The principles define what we must stop doing as a society, in order to ensure that there will be ‘enough for all forever’ both now, and in the future.

The sustainability principles include three ecological principles and five social principles: